Moonrise and New Desktops!

posted by tucker




So I’ve finally had time to sit down and begin work on the site (beyond the occasional blog post, of course) and have gotten a very early version of the “Desktops” page online. The purpose of this page is really simple: to provide some of our favorite images in the most popular desktop sizes, ready for you to download and use as wallpapers. Right now there are only 3 images up, one of them being the image in this post ­čÖé It takes a seriously long amount of time to make the crops of each image, mostly because the aspect ratios change from 16:10 to 16:9 and the worst is the 4:3, non-widescreen because it usually involves chopping off a significant portion of the image and ruining the composition. But, those of you with resolutions of 1280×1024 or 1024×768 will be able to use them, and that’s what counts. It takes me a long time to decide what to get rid of in the crops, and then I have to upload them and create all of the different links… Expect more images to show up there over time; I will probably put a note in my future blog posts when there are new ones to be had. As always, if you want the full-resolution image, just click on it on the main blog. I have no idea how much time or energy Giacomo or Andrew has for this, so it may just be my imagery for a while, but you never know.

Here’s yet another one of Maine, a place that has given me a wealth of material to work with in just the two short visits I’ve taken there recently. This is from the familiar location of my dock, but at a different time and in a different direction. The moon is rising on the left, but the sun has just barely set, so there’s still a lot of ambient light giving definition to the trees and clouds. I really like this one, and it is the second to last image from Maine that I had left to post. The last is my favorite! Anyway, here’s the moonrise, and be sure to check it out in desktop form as well.

Usually it is hard to capture the moon, as lack of light results in long exposures which show the moon's movement, but luckily there was enough light for fast exposures.

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